deceptivecadenza:

"Ultralight Violin", by Joseph Curtin. One of my favorites.

(via impromptucantabile)

huh

huh

lonequixote:

The Golden Knight (detail of Beethoven Frieze) ~ Gustav Klimt

lonequixote:

The Golden Knight (detail of Beethoven Frieze) Gustav Klimt

(via yoshebitch)

The researchers found that that sad music has a counterintuitive appeal – it actually makes people feel better. Sad songs allow listeners to experience indirectly the emotions expressed in the lyrics and implied by the (usually) minor-key melodies. The sadness may not directly reflect the listener’s own experiences, but it triggers chemicals in our brain that can produce a cathartic response: tears, chills, an elevated heartbeat. This is not an unpleasant feeling, and may explain why listeners are inclined to buy sad songs and why artists want to write or sing them. — The science of why we love sad songs. Pair with these 7 essential reads on music, emotion, and the brain. (via explore-blog)

(via mozartmozart)

ugh went through 6 recordings of don giovanni cant find one i like

deceptivecadenza:

Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich (1906-1975) at the premiere of his first piano concerto in Moscow.

deceptivecadenza:

Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich (1906-1975) at the premiere of his first piano concerto in Moscow.

(via blogthoven)

una-lady-italiana:

Maria Callas

una-lady-italiana:

Maria Callas

(via blogthoven)