After attending an April 20, 1832 charity concert by Niccolò Paganini for the victims of a Parisian cholera epidemic, Liszt became determined to become as great a virtuoso on the piano as Paganini was on the violin. According to a letter to Pierre Wolff of May 2, 1832, he was practicing scales, thirds, sixths, octaves, tremolos, repetitions of notes, cadenzas, etc. up to five hours a day. However, by the time the letter was delivered, Liszt was no longer practising that much. According to a second part, written on May 8, he had left Paris, following an invitation by one family Reiset for a vacation in Ecoutebœuf, a small place near Rouen. — Liszt’s wikipedia article
Liszt told his student Valerie Boissier and her mother Auguste that he would cease giving lessons to concentrate all of his forces on his development as artist.

In spite of his announcement, Liszt continued giving lessons.
— Liszt’s wikipedia article
Since April 28, 1834, Liszt was in Paris alone again, while Marie d’Agoult had retired to Croissy. In May 1834, he had a dispute with Madame Laborie. She presumed that he was still in love with Adèle de Laprunarède and tried to force him to give her Adèles letters. On May 16 Liszt left Paris, following an invitation by one Madame Haineville to Castle Carentonne near Bernay in Normandy. While he was in Carentonne Marie d’Agoult found some of his old letters to Euphémie Didier, suspecting they were written to Adèle and Liszt had become engaged with her. — Liszt’s wikipedia article
We are all very lucky to live in a world where there is this much music. — John Frusciante of Red Hot Chili Peppers  (via frvsciante)

(via psychedelic-lovers)

classicaloboist:

thesarahholder:

Rimsky-Korsakov’s description of woodwinds. Hilarious.

"Artless and gay in the major, pathetic and sad in the minor." Thanks Rimsky. You make me feel a whole lot better.

classicaloboist:

thesarahholder:

Rimsky-Korsakov’s description of woodwinds. Hilarious.

"Artless and gay in the major, pathetic and sad in the minor." Thanks Rimsky. You make me feel a whole lot better.

(via swimmingviolist)

composersillustrated:

Hector Berlioz by Félix “Nadar” Tournachon

composersillustrated:

Hector Berlioz by Félix “Nadar” Tournachon

(via composersillustrated)

The role of Sesto… It’s as if Mozart really created something in this sort of crystalline box on a silver platter that is everything. I think the role of Sesto is one of the most complete, complicated, rich, tortured, beautiful, human roles that I’ve ever had the privilege of singing. — Joyce DiDonato, speaking after my own heart (via parmandil)

(via that-feminist-soprano)

upperstory:

Rite of Spring, Igor Stravinsky  Bassoon Excerpt

upperstory:

Rite of Spring, Igor Stravinsky
Bassoon Excerpt

(via that-feminist-soprano)

I literally cannot fathom how people can dislike classical music. I mean, if you dislike it then that’s entirely your prerogative… But I just don’t understand how that could work. It’s some of the most intense musical experiences you can get! Just. Everything. It’s WABAM HERE IS YOUR CHOSEN EMOTION IN MUSIC FORM. You want sadness? Here you go. Want a frolicking revelry? Bam got that too. Want righteous sweeping music suitable for leading your army into the face of certain death? Coming right up… Classical music, man. It is amazing.

il-tenore-regina:

BLESS. 

honestly i don’t think it’s that confusing. people are different from each other and what we can take in is not the same from person to person. people aren’t conditioned to like classical music so many people simply don’t hear the stuff in it that its lovers hear. no big deal

(via that-feminist-soprano)